Archive for the FAR 61.160 Tag

First R-ATP Authorizations Announced

Robert Chapin
2013-08-25T20:27:29+00:00

Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate  with Reduced Aeronautical ExperienceThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) this week issued the first Letters of Authorization for universities to make their graduates eligible for an airline pilot certificate under FAR 61.160.

It is a short list of lucky firsts:

  • Eastern Kentucky University
  • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • University of North Dakota

These three universities can now officially certify graduates as qualifying for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot (R-ATP) check ride.  Without such certification, pilots are required to meet a new minimum experience level of 1,500 flight hours before working at an airline.

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23 Aug 2013

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Aviation News

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R-ATP Regulation to Reality

Robert Chapin
2014-09-05T19:34:28+00:00

The newly-promulgated FAR 61.160 went into effect last week.  Already, I am seeing positive changes in the aviation industry.  Hiring is on a rapid up-swing, and rumors are starting to circulate about a liberal interpretation of the new first officer qualifications and certification rules.

While discussing the potential for a pilot shortage last year, I didn’t yet mention the combined effects of existing trends and the looming 1,500-hour minimum experience level for new first officers.  What was happening at the time, and slowly becoming problematic, was that the regional airlines were increasing their own hiring qualifications.  Those hiring policies were becoming restrictive faster than the country was producing ATP-qualified pilots.  Remember, before the Airline Safety Act of 2010 there was no requirement for regional airlines to hire ATP certified first officers.  But the Act required by August 1, 2013 that “all flight crewmembers have obtained an airline transport pilot certificate.”  The Act also required the FAA to issue its Final Rule on this by an August 1, 2012 deadline, which it failed to do.  This left airlines in the awkward position of hiring only those pilots who could obtain an ATP before the 2013 deadline.  Hiring slowed to near zero because there was a shortage of entry-level pilots who could accumulate 1,500 hours of flight experience.

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4 Aug 2013

Category:
Hangar Talk

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First Officer Qualification Rule in Detail

Robert Chapin
2016-12-24T14:33:50+00:00

Cover page of the Federal Register for July 15.The new first officer qualifications are a hot topic.  On July 10, the FAA released its Final Rule, which should appear in the Federal Register next week.  Everyone has something to say about this.  But opinions aside, all I can I find on the web is the text of the new rule and several paraphrased copies of the FAA press release.

Let’s take a closer look at what’s inside the 221 pages of the Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations.

To get the most important information up front here, I compiled a detailed summary of changes as they would apply to a graduate of a qualifying 4-year degree program.

I also outlined the structure of the Final Rule and noted the page numbers of some important sections.  The small page numbers correspond to the unofficial FAA version, followed in parentheses by the official page number in the Federal Register.  For example: Page 1 (42324).  This will help you to reference either version of the Final Rule.

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13 Jul 2013

Category:
Regulations

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First Officer Epoch Next August

Robert Chapin
2014-01-31T02:26:32+00:00
Rob visiting the captain's seat in a 747.

What are airline pilots really made of?

Pilot employment qualifications are changing.  For the potential first officer at a regional or major airline, this change will be huge.

Currently, the requirements for acting as a first officer or second in command (SIC) of an airliner are simple.  All it takes is a commercial pilot license.  The captain is required to have an airline pilot license, but not the first officer.  This is all laid out in the two paragraphs of the applicable regulation number 121.437.  A commercial pilot license can be obtained after meeting the minimum 250 hours of flight time experience.

Starting on August 1, 2013, the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010 will remove all commercial pilots from domestic, flag, and supplemental operations.  By itself, sec. 216(a)(2)(B)(i) of this Act would require “all flight crewmembers” to hold an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate, which in turn requires at least 1,500 hours of pilot time experience.  That’s six times the current requirement to become a first officer.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is wisely using the time before August to develop a regulation that does not require 1,500 hours.  Its latest proposal, dated February 29, 2012, allows graduates of a 4-year degree program to obtain the needed license by meeting the following requirements:

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23 Sep 2012

Category:
On Assignment

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